Facebook Wants Your Nude Pics Now To Stop Revenge Porn Later

Posted November 10, 2017

"With its billions of users, Facebook is one place where many offenders aggress because they can maximize the harm by broadcasting the nonconsensual porn to those most close to the victim".

Facebook's customer support team will then review a blurred version of the image to ensure that it is explicit, and then "hash" it before it is deleted.

Facebook is trying to fight revenge porn by encouraging users in Australia to submit their nude photos to prevent them from being shared without their consent.

It will store a "fingerprint" of images to prevent any copies of them being shared by disgruntled ex-lovers. While the initial report made clear that it was not in fact counter-productive and gave Facebook the means to track the files across its network, many people still walked away from the story bewildered.

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Facebook will get noticed by this and they will make the image matched using their image-matching technology and this will lead to a tag over the image with which no one can share that image.

"The safety and well-being of the Facebook community is our top priority", Ms Davis said.

In the pilot scheme, users complete an online form outlining their concerns on the e-safety commissioner's website - and it notifies Facebook of the situation. Stamos went on to say that Facebook takes steps to protect the data and only retains non-reversible hashes. The company considered blurring out images before they ended up in the hands of human reviewers, but decided against it because that may have resulted in accidentally hashing legitimate images.

The scheme is aimed at people who are anxious partners or ex-partners may share the images without their consent - and is being trialled in Australia, the US, Canada and the UK. It used this to prevent the image spreading and closed down the majority of accounts reported to it as hosting such images.