North Korea hackers stole South Korea-US war plans: Lawmaker

Posted October 12, 2017

In late September, B-1 bombers flew the first mission this century north of the demilitarized zone (DMZ) that divides North Korea and South Korea. As part of the exercise, two American B-1 bombers and South Korean and Japanese fighter jets flew over the Korean Peninsula. The South Korean military added that the regular deployment training is aimed at enhancing extended deterrence capabilities against North Korea. There are also serious concerns about North Korea's cyberwarfare capabilities, but the US has been carrying out operations of its own to counter North Korean cyber operations in Northeast Asia and elsewhere. In August, Pyongyang threatened to shoot intermediate range missiles towards the vicinity of Guam, a target frequently subjected to sabre-rattling from the North. North Korea's possession of secret war plans would require a major overhaul of how South Korea and its ally Washington would respond if there's another war on the Korean Peninsula.

US Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley made clear Monday what a bind the US is in when it comes to solving the challenge of North Korea's nuclear and missile programs, stating there are "no risk-free options" but said there is also not an "indefinite amount of time" to solve the crisis. Pyongyang belatedly responded by relocating some of its military aircraft to its east coast, the National Intelligence Service then said.

In a pair of tweets sent Saturday afternoon, Trump said past agreements with North Korea have all been violated. Kim is the third generation of his family to rule North Korea.

Outside governments and worldwide human rights organizations say Kim rules as a tyrant over a largely malnourished and abused population while enjoying a luxurious lifestyle backed up by a weapons program almost advanced enough to viably target the USA mainland with nuclear-tipped missiles.

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According to South Korea's Yonhap news agency this is not the first time the communist regime to the north has launched a tirade of cyber attacks on the country, with hacks targeting government websites and facilities being commonplace in recent years.

The Pentagon also declined to comment specifically on reports of the potential breach, but spokesman Col. Robert Manning said on Tuesday that the USA is "confident in the security of our operations plans and our ability to deal with any threat from North Korea".

There is no evidence that the attacks were successful, and cybersecurity experts believe that North Korea lacks the ability to disrupt the power grid.