Iran voices concerns over Rohingya muslims in Myanmar

Posted August 30, 2017

Arakan Times, an online news website serving the Rohingya community, said Myanmar border guard police and soldiers burned down 1,000 homes in actions beginning on Saturday and continuing on Monday.

Soldiers had detained and returned almost 500 Rohingya trying to cross the border since Monday, Shariful Islam Jamaddar, a deputy commander of BGB, told AFP.

At least 109 people were killed in the recent violence in Rakhine, a lot of them militants, but also members of the security forces and civilians.

An independent commission must investigate recent atrocities against the Muslim community in Myanmar, a London-based human rights organization has urged Myanmar's government. "Shuffling all the blame on insurgents doesn't spare the Burmese government from its global obligations to stop abuses and investigate alleged violations".

Both the government, in official statements, and its critics, in posts on social media often accompanied by video clips, said there was widespread burning of buildings and even whole neighbourhoods in Maungdaw township in northern Rakhine.

"Shuffling all the blame on insurgents doesn't spare the Burmese [Myanmar] government from its global obligations to stop abuses and investigate alleged violations".

Refugees have told news outlets like the Associated Press, Al Jazeera and CNN that Myanmar security forces are killing Rohingya civilians. His comments reinforced a message from UN Secretary- General Antonio Guterres, who called on Bangladesh to step up assistance to escaping civilians, in particular, the wounded.

Rohingya Muslims are a persecuted minority in Myanmar, which is predominantly Buddhist.

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Bangladeshi border guards, who had provided them with food and water, on Monday sought to push them back to their own country.

Some 3,000 people have fled to Bangladesh amid the mounting violence, causing the country to tighten its borders.

Myanmar's military responded with a massive security crackdown.

In May, the Pontiff received the de facto head of the Myanmar government and Nobel laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi, at the Vatican, in a meeting that also marked the beginning of bilateral diplomatic relations.

The UN chief made the appeal recognising that Bangladesh has hosted generously refugees from Myanmar for decades. Cramped in refugee camps, these asylum seekers face the dangers of epidemics and the possible wrath of the Bangladesh army who want to turn them away.

Hussein also expressed concern that more than 8,700 Rohingya Muslims have fled from Myanmar into Bangladesh since the attacks, adding to the tens of thousands who have been arriving in Bangladesh since October 2016.

At least 109 people were killed in the recent violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state, a lot of them militants, but also members of the security forces and civilians.